John Muller
How U.S. Interventionists Abetted the Rise of ISIS

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In The Wall Street Journal, Rand Paul says that our Middle Eastern policy is unhinged, flailing about to see who to act against next, with little regard to consequences.

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With Regulation Looming, It’s Time for Industry to Raise the Bar for Software Quality | Innovation Insights | WIRED

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It’s a well-known fact that development project failures, and the necessary accompanying re-work, are common in our industry. Though many have given up on attempts to remediate the situation, the Cost of Poor Quality (CoPQ) can be controlled. At the root of the issue is a general lack of concern for CoPQ from development and…

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38 maps that explain the global economy

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Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there’s no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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Bill Barnett on Strategy: Why You Don’t Understand “Disruption”
‘Last Cigarette’ by Dramarama is my new jam.
All You Can Eat | Magazine | WIRED

See on Scoop.it - Health Fitness Nutrition

Adam Voorhes In January of this year, the first subject checked into the metabolic ward at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, to participate in one of the most rigorous dietary studies ever devised. For eight weeks, he was forbidden to leave. He spent two days of each week inside tiny airtight rooms…

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“People want money” | FT Alphaville

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"Money," we were once told, "is whatever you can use to pay your debts."

That definition is both precise and slippery, since much of what can be used as “money” during good times is prone to losing its money-ness precisely when the need to repay debt is greatest.

Think of someone in the days before deposit insurance trying to pull cash from a failed bank to cover expenses after losing a job — or, for a more recent example, a hedge fund attempting to cover redemptions from panicked investors only to find that the prime broker responsible for holding its cash had blown up and the collateral it had provided was worthless.

The only kinds of money that reliably hold their value are the ones explicitly backed by a strong government*. Unfortunately, there isn’t nearly enough available to satiate the total demand for cash. Financial firms fill the gap by creating products that often offer many of the conveniences of money but that lack government guarantees, thereby rendering them inherently unstable and prone to crises.

These products are “mostly money” in the way that Westley was only “mostly dead.” They were also the topic of the “Workshop on the Risks of Wholesale Funding,” which we attended last week at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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What the Neoreaction Doesn’t Understand about Democracy

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The empirical evidence on public policy under dictatorship represents a serious challenge to the views of the anti-democracy far right.

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Google Fiber Is Fast, but Is It Fair?

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Google’s effort to provide faster Internet speeds at lower cost is changing how next-generation broadband is rolled out—while stirring debate about the “digital divide.”

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America’s economic problems predated the Great Recession

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Here is a very good piece by Binyamin Appelbaum, focusing on the research of Davis and Haltiwanger, here is one excerpt: Employment losses during the Great Recession may have had more to do with factors like the rise of Walmart […]

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